PRB’s History

Partners in Revitalization and Building (formerly Pamir Reconstruction Bureau), PRB, a non –governmental, non-profitable organization was established in July 1990 by a group of Afghan experts headed by Eng. Mohammad Kabir. PRB since its inception supported sustainable economic and social recovery in its area of operation

  •           Expanding and training veterinary VFUs further to northern region
  • ­          Kabul milk scheme
  • ­          Job creation for women – empowerment of women in Kabul in Shamali plain, north
  • ­          Bee keep, livestock extension, sericulture, cashmere, poultry
  • ­          Income generation for women (tailoring, bee keeping, patu making, carpet weaving etc.)
  • ­          Community development
  • ­          School building, infrastructure road, bridge,
  • ­          Safe drinking water, sanitation
  • ­          Consultancy and engineering services
  • ­          School building and health clinics and government building
  •           2011 –Now- agriculture, livestock, capacity building, poultry (empowerment, job creation)

Years 1991-92 were the years of building of capacities and institution establishment. During these years’ attention had been focused to accomplish a very decent working relation with community, authorities and other involved in the field. The capacity building program latter on became a principle component in all PRB activities. Now-a-days about 83 staff are employed in different offices and projects. Their skills are crucial for the continuity and sustainability of PRB activities.

A proper work-plan with the reflection of the community needs had been prepared and executed in each year of its activities. The work-plan had the inspiration of donor’s agencies. In 1995-96 when factional fighting fueled by the neighboring countries and chaos griped all Afghanistan especially after the fall of Kabul in the hand of Taliban, the aids for Afghanistan got squeezed to minimal. PRB conducted a comprehensive survey of need assessments from its areas of operation. As a result a work plan (1997-99) had been chalked-out by the program section and endorsed by PRB management team and general assembly.

The 1997-99-work plan had three important features: (1). Involvement of the community in projects planning, implementation, management and ownership (2). Moving from project-wise to program-wise with integrated approach. The program received an encouraging support from both the community and donors. In the three years’ program number of reconstruction income generation and agricultural activities had been approved and executed by program section of PRB.

The three years’ work plan of PRB received an encouraging support from donors and community. The lessons learned from successful completion of three-year work plan (1997-1999) bound PRB leadership to prepare a five years’ strategic work plan for year 2000-2004. The strategic work plan for the years 2000 to 2004 is the continuation of previous work plan (1997-1999) in more comprehensive manner.

Based on the guidance of the work plan PRB was able to receive grants for execution of some vital sustainable projects including: Kabul Milk scheme, bee keeping, sericulture, carpet weaving, embroidery, tailoring, leather works, knitting, jewelry, flower making, poultry raising, Patu Making ,carpentry training, computer training and English language courses. These projects were mainly for women and girls in different parts of the country.

Kabul Milk scheme was a successful achievement to enhance the livelihood of the farmers around Kabul and provides hygienic milk products to Kabul residents. The scheme was established during most difficult period and with meagre resources. The scheme became an example for other organizations and firms to establish and operate diary plants in other parts of the country.

PRB feels the vulnerability menace is the inheritance of decades of war and conflicts. It can be reduced by the community empowerment Also with the peace- building concepts, the community will be better equipped to undertake social and economic rehabilitation in the spirit of unity cooperation and national integration. PRB always tried to design its program in such a way to reduce poverty and enhance the empowerment among the beneficiaries of its targeted areas.

The General Assembly is the highest decision making body in PRB. All the important decisions in the organization are made by this setup. It includes the preparation of charter, organizational chart and its amendment and other issues in the organization. The General Assembly appoints the Executive Director. The organization under the leadership of its Board of Director/ Executive Director desires to focus its work according to the: support communities towards self-reliance, prioritize participatory approaches and endorse the capacity building of its staff

PRB defines accountability as explaining, being held responsible for and hearing the perspectives of others about how well we are meeting our commitments – and then actively making changes and improvements based on what we have learned and heard

Being accountable to our stakeholders means ensuring that we share information in a transparent way or, where we are unable to satisfy an information request, providing an explanation. PRB posts a substantial amount of information on the internet, including strategic plans, annual reports, advocacy policy reports, programme reports, research reports

PRB believes that solving the complex challenges of poverty and social injustice can best be achieved by working with others. By pooling resources and expertise, our collective action is greater and more impactful than what we can deliver on our own.

PRB is committed to partnerships that are empowering, respectful, and focused on mutual learning and growth. We believe that poverty and social injustice can best be addressed through strategic and impactful partnerships with a range of actors from government, civil society, private sector and beyond.

Our work would not be possible without the support of those who partner with us to fund our work – individuals, corporations, trusts, foundations, governments, institutions and community groups.

PRB projects have been funded by : UNSYSTEM(UNDP, FAO, UNOCHA, UNICEF/ WFP UN Habitat and UNODC ) Canada Fund, IRC/RAB/ USAID   AWO, Embassy of Japan/JICA, IDRF/ Canada, Oxfam GB, WHH,  EU, Chemotic/ USAID,  LOUIS BERGER /USAID/  AQIP, ACTION AID, ICARDA/ IFDC, USAID, GIZ, , ARD/USAID, ASAP/DCA, PADCO/USAID, Shelter for Life, Merlin,  ACTED/DHSA/EU ACBAR/ WFP , ICARDA/ IFDC  URF/KFW , Chemotics AQIP , ACTION AID CIDA/IDRF Chemotic /RAMP CHF/USAID  DCA/RAMP/ USAID  DCA/PRT RAMP/ USAID PADCO/USAID,  ARD/USAID, GTZ/SPF, CHF